Archive for March, 2009

h1

Now Showing: new painting idea

March 29, 2009

This is an old sketch I made in Oakland, CA while leaning on the back of my car waiting for a friend to join me for coffee. Unfortunately, she arrived before I could quite get it finished. I’m hoping I can expand on it to make it into a full fledged painting. Somewhere I have a couple photos I shot later in the same spot that I can use for reference if I can locate them. We’ll see how this one germinates…

Preliminary sketch

Preliminary sketch



Read other posts in this series:

  • 2 -Painting Updated
  • 3 -Latest Version
  • h1

    Illustrators with Punch

    March 24, 2009

    punch

    Pulcinella (aka Punchinello) was a comic character from the Comedia dell’arte theatre of Italy (think Punch and Judy,) and charivari was an ancient folk custom of making a noisy racket to scare away evil spirits. In 1841 a newspaper magazine was passed through London called “Punch, Or The London Charivari,” no doubt with the intention of lifting the spirits of its readers. Its namesake, the beak-nosed Mr. Punch, was used as their icon of satirical irreverence. The interior pages would be filled with articles and drawings of satire and humor. Other versions of Punch sprang up around the world (Germany, China, and elsewhere) to capitalize on its popularity. The original had many publishing rivals, but none lasted as long. The London publication ran for over 150 years*, an amazing feat. It briefly reappeared in a different format, and ten years later closed for good in 2002.

    Punch laid the groundwork for the editorial and gag cartoon panels that we still see today. The early editions contained art by Charles Keene, John Tenniel, and Ernest (Winnie the Pooh) Shepard. Later editions contained great drawings by other artists such as Bernard Partridge, Linley Sambourne, F.H. Townsend, or those marvelous horses by Denholm Armour.

    There are book collections available, but they are rare now and out of print; however, Google Books has generously scanned several of the older copies and placed them online (that’s where the images below come from.) If you are at all fond of excellent ink drawing I strongly encourage you to give them a look. Hopefully, what goes around comes around and soon we’ll see a reemergence of this kind of work in the years to come.

    Denholm Armour

    Denholm Armour


    Bernard Partridge

    Bernard Partridge

    Linley Sambourne

    Linley Sambourne

    John Tenniel

    John Tenniel



    More:
    http://www.punch.co.uk
    http://www.punchcartoons.com

    *Note: Officially I’ve read the first publication was 1841, but have seen a collected issue that claims to go back as far as 1837.

    h1

    Books by Pádraic Colum and Willy Pogány

    March 22, 2009
    From "The King of Ireland's Son"

    Vilmos Andreas (i.e. Willy Andrew) Pogány was a Hungarian born (1883) artist who immigrated to America in 1914 and his art career was expansive. He designed stage sets and costumes for the Metropolitan Opera, worked as a Hollywood art director in the 30s, designed hotel interiors, illustrated magazines covers, and became especially well known illustrating classic books from “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” to “Mother Goose.” In the last years of his life he worked as a portraitist and died in 1955.

    Early in his career he illustrated a series of books by the Irish author Pádraic Colum. He was a playwright and poet who also came to America in 1914 and was a couple years older than Pogany. He later lived in France and was close friends with James Joyce, helping him with “Finnegan’s Wake.”

    pogany2

    I don’t have information on just how Colum and Pogány got together, but it seems likely that they were close, since they had similar interests and background. The five Colum books illustrated by Pogány were of mythological subjects designed for a children’s library. The drawing style Pogány chose for many of these is black and white line art reminiscent of ancient Greek vase painting, but “The King of Ireland’s Son,” (as in the first insert above) has a more traditionally illustrated look. I have not yet found a copy of “The Frenzied Prince,” which I believe happens to be the last book he ever illustrated, published about 20 years after the other four. Colum’s writing style is quite entertaining, and his research on the myths themselves seems quite thorough and accurate.

    Several of the Colum Pogany books are available for free on the net, some as PDF downloads with good quality scans of the art. You can find them at Google Books. I recommend them highly, for the writing and the art. There are also other books illustrated by Pogány there, such as “Faust.”

    Pogány also wrote three art books called “Drawing Lessons” (a.k.a. The Art of Drawing,) “Oil Lessons,” and “Watercolor Lessons,” and while the information in the books doesn’t impress me as much as others on these subjects, the artwork is very nice.

    Colum & Pogány books:
    The King of Ireland’s Son
    The Children’s Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy
    The Children of Odin: A Book of Northern Myths
    The Golden Fleece and the Heroes Who Lived Before Achilles
    The Frenzied Prince, Being Heroic Stories of Ancient Ireland

    More:
    about Willy Pogány
    about Pádraic Colum
    List of illustrated books by Pogány
    List of books written by Colum
    Nice scans of Pogány art at Golden Comic Book Stories
    Pogány art at Nocloo.com – search “pogany” to find more art there

    h1

    Clone Backup of a PC Hard Drive

    March 19, 2009

    This will be off-topic from the usual art subject matter, but will still be useful to computers users, including artists. Unlike basic backups of files, in order to make a copy of your PC operating system you have to create a clone of that drive when the system files are not running. You can’t just drag and drop the operating system files. The way I do this is to boot from my CD drive and run the clone software from there.

    The reason you really want to have a backup of your system disk is to avoid having to reinstall everything from scratch, including all the security upgrades and all your previously installed software, should you have a disk failure on your booting drive. It’s also useful if you’re migrating to a larger drive or to a different machine.

    The cloning software I use is Clone MAXX by Convar. They offer a freeware version that works very simply. You’ll also need an internal drive that makes CDs, and software that supports ISO files for making a CD you can boot from. I use MagicISO, but most CD making software supports ISO files.

    I just went through this operation last night, and I try to remember to do it regularly every one or two months. My current PC has an 80GB boot drive and a second 160GB drive attached. To perform this clone backup, I shutdown the system and replace the second drive with another 80GB drive. I have to use an internal drive for this setup since an external USB drive wouldn’t be recognized by the booting CD. I power up the system with the Clone MAXX CD which displays a simple DOS screen that reads the system configuration and asks me what drives to use as the source and clone. My current boot drive uses a little less than 20GB, and the clone process took under an hour to duplicate. When it’s complete I shutdown and temporarily replace the original boot drive with the clone as the master drive, and then boot up again to see that everything comes up properly. I can also use this setup to clone the other drive as long as the backup drive has enough capacity.

    I noticed old files in a separate partition on the clone disk were erased, so if your clone drive is partitioned move them off there before cloning. I believe if your boot drive is partitioned, any files in those partitions will also be cloned, but my boot drive isn’t partitioned, so I don’t know for sure.

    h1

    Deer Painting Done

    March 12, 2009
    Final painting

    Final painting

    I touched up the front deer’s neck, chest, and legs a little, and toned down some of the grass areas. I think I’d better stop on this one now so that I don’t mess it up.



    Read other posts in this series:

  • Deer at Dusk Part 1
  • Deer at Dusk Part 2
  • Deer at Dusk Part 3
  • h1

    Deer Painting Final Stage

    March 10, 2009

    whitetail03

    Here’s the latest version of the deer painting. I need to add a bit more modeling to the front deer’s body which I’ll probably do with glazing, as well as a few extra touch ups here and there.



    Read other posts in this series:

  • Deer at Dusk Part 1
  • Deer at Dusk Part 2
  • Deer at Dusk Part 4
  • h1

    Deer Painting Update

    March 7, 2009
    Painting update

    Painting update

    Here’s an update on the deer painting. Still have the big boy in the front to finish. That shade of blue in the grass areas is not as saturated as it appears in this photo, but I might still need to go back in and tone it down some. Those leaves above his head might need to be a bit brighter too.



    Read other posts in this series:

  • Deer at Dusk Part 1
  • Deer at Dusk Part 3
  • Deer at Dusk Part 4