Posts Tagged ‘Casein’

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Painting Update: Coffee at the Window

January 11, 2018

I’ve gotten a little further on the painting. Added some neutral undertone washes, and started working on the cabinets, hand and cup. I had forgotten to put in the coffee maker in the layout, so I painted that in, too. It’s all still rough. I’ll polish it up as I get further along.

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Making Red Oxide Casein Paint for New Painting

January 7, 2018

As I’m starting to work on the background of the new painting, I noticed I was too low on the red oxide paint that I wanted to use, so I needed to mix up some more.

I also wanted to test out the package of Bob’s Red Mill milk powder I bought recently to see how well it works for making a casein binder. 1 quart of rehydrated milk gave me a little less than 6 ounces of casein when I added 1/2 cup of vinegar. That’s the separated milk liquid on the right. I’m used to seeing the milk coagulate into a large ball after I add the vinegar, which I then tear it into small pieces so it will dissolve better. This milk forms small clumps of casein instead, as seen here, so that saves me an extra step.

I added about 2 teaspoons of Borax diluted in 1/2 cup distilled water to this casein, and let that sit for about 24 hours to form a thick smooth gel. This will be my paint binder.

The red oxide pigment was purchased from Camden Grey. A one pound bag cost me only $3. It makes a lovely dark red burgundy color that mixes very easily with my binder. I’m waiting on an order of empty paint tubes to arrive, so I’m using a one ounce jar in the meantime.

Here’s a scan of the paint on a piece of watercolor paper. I painted it over some black Sharpie marks to show how opaque it is. It also thins down nicely. Now I’m ready to get back to work.

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Portrait of Gennifer in Casein

November 22, 2017

I saved this material that was wrapped around a computer monitor I bought some time ago, and it’s a curious type of fabric. It feels like Tyvek, which is a brand of fabric from Dupont made of spun polyethylene fibers, but this tears more easily than sheets of that I seen before. Anyway, I wanted to experiment with it for a new painting.

The feel of this reminds me of felt. If it’s wadded up it will show creases, which made me want to use that as a textured surface, so I cut a section about 12″ square, wadded it up into a ball, and glued it to a thin sheet of wood veneer.

Here I’m starting to tone the fabric with a thin wash of burnt umber casein that I made. It takes the paint very well, like staining raw muslin.

This is the final result. It’s based on a photo of mine of my friend, Gennifer. I’ve added titanium white for the highlight areas. It was a very interesting surface to paint on. I need to hunt down some Tyvek now, and see if it behaves the same way.

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Casein Glue Made from Instant Milk Powder

September 23, 2017

I was at a friend’s house recently, and as we were talking about my experiments with making casein, she complained that she had some dry “instant” milk powder she had bought for her young son, but he didn’t like the taste. She let me take it home to experiment with, since I had never tried making casein from a dry powdered milk before.

This particular brand from Saco Foods is like other commercial milk powders I’ve seen at grocery stores “fortified” with vitamin A & D (and sometimes E) so I’ve always avoided using them, but there are other brands on the market that don’t have anything else added. It could be convenient and more economical to make casein from this if it works out well. It did. Here’s how I made it:

I followed the instructions to re-hydrate the powder by adding 3 3/4 cup of water (distilled) to one package, 3.2 ounces, of powder. This made about 4 cups of milk. I used a blender to mix it well, and set it in the refrigerator for 24 hours. The next morning, I poured the milk into a pot, and heated it on the stove to @150 degrees, turned off the heat, and added 1/2 cup of distilled white vinegar. Stirring for a couple minutes it congealed into a ball of casein. So far so good. I removed the ball of casein and filtered the liquid through cheesecloth to catch as much extra casein as possible, and then tore up all the casein into small pieces so it would dissolve more easily. In the picture below is a bowl of about 2.5 ounces of casein from the 4 cups of instant milk.

I rinsed the casein in clean water a couple times to remove as much of the vinegar as possible. Next I placed it in a 12 ounce jar, and I diluted 2 teaspoons of borax in 1/2 cup of distilled water that I heated in the microwave for about 20 seconds, and then added to the casein. This will turn the casein into a glue gel.

After about 6 hours or so the casein had started to transform into a gel, but was still a little lumpy. At this point I stirred in a drop of thymol to act as a preservative, and let it sit for awhile longer. After about 12 hours it had transformed into a very thick and stiff gel, about 1/2 cup.

Comparing this to other casein glue I’ve made I would say the gel from raw milk is more opaque, and gel made from dry casein powder is has a slightly darker amber tone. It does feel slightly sticky, so I would guess it will work just fine for my needs in making paint, gesso, or fixative. Very encouraging.

I’ll check out a few local grocery stores to see if I can find some instant milk powder that is unfortified. If not there are plenty of brands on the internet I could order. Here is one from Bob’s Red Mill, for example. The label says it has 0% vitamin A, so no Palm oil is added, and no vitamins D or E. The vitamin C is a natural milk component. From that 22 ounce packet I should get about 4 cups (32 ounces) of casein gel. If I remember correctly, I can get about 16 ounces of gel from a gallon of fresh milk. In powder form, the milk can be stored up to 2 years.

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Painting Update 2: A Kiss On the Neck

August 20, 2017

A few spots need a little more tweaking, but it’s almost finished.

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Painting Update: A Kiss On the Neck

August 15, 2017

After getting sidetracked for a few days trying to earn some spending money, I’m back on this painting again. It seemed like I had gotten too rusty from being away so long, working extra hard to get her face just right, but I think I’m getting the hang of it now. Maybe things will go more smoothly when I switch over to the guy’s head.

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Shiva Casein Paint Test Update

July 24, 2017

To follow up on my previous post, I had found that one of my Richeson/Shiva paints, Cadmium Green, transferred to a dry paper towel with just some light rubbing after the paint had dried. Now I wanted to see if other tubes I owned had this same problem. They do.

This picture shows a sheet of paper on which I painted 1 inch swatches of all the different tubes of Shiva paints I have. The paper towel at the bottom shows pigment from each swatch that transferred over. I did not dilute the paint at all with water, and did not apply the paint too thickly. All of the paints smeared easily when rubbed, some more than others, with the sole exception of the Raw Sienna. The ivory black in particular smeared very badly, and even after a day of drying felt to have a weak paint film.

Since all of the paints are old, in some cases decades old, I asked around to other people who used these paints if they could test any tubes they might have that are newer, and see if they had the same problem. I heard back from a couple people. One person had some Richeson caseins that were only months old, and found they had the exact same pigment transfer problem. The other artist rubbed the surface of paintings he had made that were at least 3 months old, and said no paint at all rubbed off. What this tells me is it might be possible that if the paint is allowed to cure for awhile longer, the pigment will adhere better and not rub off. This strikes me as a strong possibility. So, I think I’ll do a new test on paint swatches that sat undisturbed for a month or more, and then see if any pigment rubs off.