Posts Tagged ‘storage’

h1

Sinopia Casein Gesso Update: Jar Problem

May 2, 2017

I’m interrupting my series of posts on the new painting to point out a problem I discovered today with a jar of Casein Gesso from Sinopia. This follows up on two posts I made in the past: one is a review of this product, and another was how I store paint containers like this upside down.

I bought this jar of gesso a little over a year ago, and keep it inside a drawer in my studio. I haven’t used it in awhile, but today I decided to open the drawer to try it out again, only to find the contents had leaked out. The lid was screwed on tight, but that wasn’t enough to stop air from getting in, and some of the contents leaking onto the drawer. Fortunately that was plastic, so it was easy to clean (that’s what that clean piece of gel is in the picture,) but I had to use a plumber’s wrench to get the lid off, and found that about 1/3 of the paint had dried out. That rounded disk inside the lid is about 1/2 inch layer of dried paint, and more dried on the sides of the jar. It had been stored upside-down.

As I mentioned in the article link above, I store containers like this upside down just for this reason. Screw-on lids of this type make very poor containers for paint, since air gets in easily. Even if this was stored upright, air gets in, and would have dried out the paint even worse. Some jars you can buy come with cushions inside the lid, sponges or thick paper, that help seal the jar. Another solution I’ve used in the past is to wrap wide tape around the outside. That has to be replaced frequently, but it’s better than throwing away paint.

Metal cans for paint make a better seal than a screw-on lid, unfortunately, a quart size can is the smallest available. Tubes are also better since the opening is smaller, so less air gets in. The best option is to use it up quickly. Prime several sheets of paper stock or canvas that you have on hand, and don’t store the left over paint for very long.

Advertisements
h1

Studio Tip – Binder Clips

January 26, 2016

I’m taking a short break from the painting to show a tip for using binder clips in the studio. I use them to keep my paint tubes organized, or for hanging sheets of paper or canvas. You can buy these at an office supply store in various sizes. These are “medium” size, 1.25 inches.

clips-on-hanger0

To slip the clip over the plastic hanger, I squeeze the metal handle and remove them from the clip. I then slide them over the hanger, and squeeze them back on clip.

clips-on-hanger1

I can now place the hanger on a rod and clip the bottom ends of paint tubes to them. This allows me to organize the paint by medium or paint color – however I need them. To keep them from sliding down the hanger, I can tie a wire “twisty” on the handle. The clips are strong, and will hold even a large tube of paint.

clips-on-hanger2

Alternatively, with this particular type of metal shelving I have, I can slip the clips over the metal rods, and not use hangers at all. You can also get some peg board hooks at a hardware store, and slide the clips on those.

clips-on-hanger2b

Another use for the clips and hanger is to hold sheets of paper or canvas using these plastic “slide-grip” binders sold for report covers.

clips-on-hanger3

They’re less likely to damage the sheets than the metal clips themselves, and will keep the sheets straight. This can be especially useful for wet surfaces that that need to dry. With the painted side facing the wall, dust is less likely to get on the surface.

clips-on-hanger4

h1

Paint Storage Tip: Gravity Is Your Friend

July 22, 2015

Some fatherly advice I received years ago from dear old Dad was to store my containers of liquid, in particular cans of paint and such, upside down. The demon of air will dry out paint, or cause it to get a dry skin layer inside the can as air that penetrates through the lid. However, when the wet liquid presses against the inside of the lid there’s less air to dry it out, and the paint will last longer.

paint_upsidedown

In this photo above you can see a few small plastic jars of some recently made gouache paint turned upside down on their lids. This is how I store them. Sometimes I put labels on the bottom. Behind them is a jar of Golden Acrylic Gesso, a bottle of acrylic medium, and some paint tubes. The bottle of medium is a little unwieldy on its cap, so I have to place it in a drawer in such a way that it won’t tip over, usually against other similar bottles stored in the same way. The paint tubes can be a problem since most manufacturers use very small caps that won’t let you balance the tube upright. Liquitex tubes are nice and large for that, but not most other brands. Alternatively, you should squeeze the tubes from the end, forcing the paint to the top and get the same benefit.

paint_upsidedown2

This is also a good way to store any cans of left over house paint you might have in the garage. Be careful of potential leaks, however, and put a plastic sheet underneath, just in case.

The motivation for this post was my reading that Golden is going to start labeling their cans upside down to encourage people to get use to this way of storing their supplies. Good for them.