Posts Tagged ‘paint’

h1

Comparing My Casein Paint to Shiva Brand

July 22, 2017

I wanted to follow up on my previous post where I made my own casein white paint, and see how well it compares to tubes of the Shiva paint I had, and discovered something interesting. I used the paint swatch I made testing my paint on a sheet of Strathmore textured “Art Paper” 65lb.

I painted a small swatch of the Shiva titanium white, undiluted, next to the swatch of mine I had made. It may be hard to tell in this photo, but I noticed their white has a slight off-white yellowish tint to it that mine does not. I let this dry for a day, and came back and gave both a buffing with some colored fabric, and saw no transfer of pigment from either swatch. Next I placed a small piece of cellophane tape over each one, rubbed it, and removed the tape. Both transferred some paint, but more paint came off the Shiva swatch, lifting almost all the paint from the paper. The casein binder I used to make my paint was over a year old, so later I’ll see if a fresher batch performs better.

Since that tube of Shiva white is many years old, I thought I’d test a newer tube of Cadmium Green that I had to see if it performed any better. Rather surprisingly the pigment adhesion was worse. I let that paint swatch dry for about 3 hours, and rubbed the surface with a paper towel. You can see quite a bit of pigment rubbed off. The tape test pulled off quite a bit of pigment also, and the way the pigment transferred was not in sections of paint, but powdery like what I saw on the paper towel. This tells me that the adhesion on this tube of Shiva paint is poor. Granted, it’s about 5 years old or so, but it shouldn’t come off this easily. I have commercial tubes of gouache that adhere better than this. I hope the newer Richeson brand of Shiva adheres better. Now I want to test the rest of the Shiva paints I have. This is not terrible, but surprising. This paint adhesion is not much better than soft pastel.

h1

Making Casein Paint: Titanium White

July 21, 2017

I’ve been wanting to get back to using one of my favorite paint mediums for awhile, casein. I took an inventory of the tubes I had available for my next project, and noticed I was short or low on a few colors, particularly titanium white, so it’s time to make some more.

I have a bathroom next to my studio space that I use exclusively for this type of work, so I clean off an area by the sink, and set up my tools and supplies. I have a large sheet of textured glass that I use for mixing the paint. There’s a mortar and pestle for smoothing the dry pigment, an empty tube for the paint, a squirt bottle of distilled water, about 4 ounces of casein binder, and white pigment.

The pigment is a little lumpy, so I use the pestle to break it down some, and place about 2.5 tablespoons of pigment on the glass with about 2 teaspoons of binder and just enough water to get the consistency of paint I want, and spend a few minutes with the spatula smoothing it out.

I test the paint I’ve mixed to see if it spreads easily with a brush without having to add any water, and check the opacity on this sheet of colored paper. It looks fine, so I repeat these steps about 2 more times to make more paint to fill the tube.

There’s enough paint now to fill up this 50ml tube and another 22ml. I seal the ends by squeezing it shut at about 1/2 inch below the end. to give me enough room to crimp.

I fold over a little of the end, and crimp it tight with some pliers, and repeat this about 2 more times to get a tight seal.

Here I have two tubes of white casein labeled and ready to use.

h1

Making Gouache Paint: Light Brown

September 23, 2016

gouache_ltbrwn1

I’m making more gouache paint. This is a tube of “light brown” I mixed up last night. It’s made of mostly raw sienna, but has a pale grey cast to it. I like to use it for skin tones. Still have to make some cerulean blue, and a mid-tone grey.

gouache_ltbrwn2

I like these empty tubes I get from Creative Mark (c/o Artarama.) No cap problems, or leaking from the tubes, and the caps have a little indentation at the top that works well for painting a color swatch to identify the paint inside. This tube is 22ml.

h1

Art Material Review: Sinopia’s Casein Gesso

November 12, 2015

caseingesso-label

A few days ago I popped over to Sinopia’s website to see what’s new. They’ve long been highly regarded as an excellent supplier of raw pigment and paint making supplies. Among this is material for making casein paint and gesso grounds. Gesso, as you may know from some previous posts of mine, is a paint ground made traditionally with rabbit skin glue or casein, and different types of plaster solids. What was new to me is they now offer a casein based gesso that you can buy ready-made. No mixing of materials, just open the can and paint it on. I ordered a small jar of it that arrived this afternoon.

As I waited for the order to arrive, I fired off a few questions to Sinopia that they responded to quickly.
If I use this on paper, since it contains oil, should I first add sizing to the paper before applying the gesso?
“Even though the Gesso contains a linseed oil emulsion, it is completely water soluble and safe to use on paper without any sort of primer. The Casein Gesso makes a great substrate for oil painting.”

Does it have a shelf life?
“No, our Gesso does not have a shelf life. Although, once the container is opened and air gets into the jar, then the paint starts to skin over after a few weeks. In that case, the dried paint layer can simply be peeled off and the paint underneath is still in perfect shape.”

Should it only be used on firm supports? Can it be used on stretched canvas as well as wood panels?
“The Gesso works well on both panels and stretched canvas.”

caseingesso-thick

Below are my first impressions of this product:
It is very thick, more so than I expected. Thicker than acrylic primers I have used, but about the same as oil primers. It can be brushed on right out of the jar, but you’ll need a good thick brush. However, it can certainly be thinned with water. If you thin it and use it as an oil paint surface, I would recommend sizing the surface first.

caseingesso-sample

In the picture above I show on the left a thinned mixture (about 30% water) on a black sheet of mat board. On the right side of the board I painted 2 coats right out of the jar. I painted the 2nd coat (not thinned) after about 15 minutes, and it took about 30 minutes or so for that to dry to the touch. A hair drier can speed up the evaporation of the water content.

caseingesso-acrylicgesso

In this picture I’m comparing the 2 coats of gesso to Golden’s acrylic primer. The primer is much thinner, and 2 coats of it are not as bright as 2 coats of gesso. The gesso covers quite well, even on this dark black paper.

caseingesso-painted

There was no information about how long to wait before I start painting on this surface. In my initial test, I waited 2 hours after applying the 2nd coat, and tested casein, oil, and gouache paint. I used the paint right out of the tube, and thinned with water or turpentine for the oil. I saw no problem with adhesion, or more importantly no reaction with the ground lifting into the paint. I even washed the surface with a brush loaded with water, dabbed it with a paper towel, and none of the white was released.

Other thoughts:
Regarding oils, it is recommended by Golden when using their acrylic primer that has been thinned with water, you should wait several days for all the water to evaporate before applying any oil paint to the primer surface. In this case, I would advise the same with the casein gesso, since there is some water already inside it.

In Sinopia’s description on the website they say this has “all the same qualities” of rabbit skin glue gesso. I would say it has some, but it doesn’t feel the same. I’ve made many gesso panels using RSG or casein (without using an oil emulsion,) and I can say that this surface feels different. Traditional gesso feels like a slab of cold stone. This reminds me more of an oil primed surface. It is a water and oil emulsion, after all. I like that feel, but it’s not like traditional gesso to me. The big difference with an oil primed surface and this, of course, is you can’t use any water media on top of an oil primer. Also, an oil primer takes a long time to cure, but this does not.

Comparing this to a traditional gesso ground, despite the different feel, this has many similarities and some benefits. RSG requires much more preparation time, and has to be held at a warm temperature while using. Once it’s made it has a shelf life of only a few days at the most. Casein gesso that I’ve made (not using emulsified oil) can last up to 4 to 6 months in refrigeration, and then starts to break down and become useless. According to Sinopia, this product can be stored indefinitely. No refrigeration is required. It’s equally as versatile as traditional gesso for use with all media, but according to Sinopia can be used on flexible surfaces like a stretched canvas, which is not true of traditional gesso.

The biggest problem I’ve had with acrylic primed surfaces is they destroy brushes. The solids in them will wear down an expensive brush in no time at all. Time will tell if this casein gesso will have the same problem. I suspect not. There are some acrylic primers that will work with watercolor or gouache, like Fredrix’s Watercolor Canvas, or Ampersand’s Aquabord, but the surface has to be made porous so they’re even rougher for brushes. Also, if you apply those primers yourself, like Golden’s Absorbent Ground, they are supposed to be applied on top of a standard acrylic ground, so you have to have both types. This casein gesso doesn’t have those problems. It appears to me at this point to be more versatile, potentially more so than any other ground on the market!

I’ve only had this for a day, so much more testing is required. My first impression is very positive.

h1

Paint Storage Tip: Gravity Is Your Friend

July 22, 2015

Some fatherly advice I received years ago from dear old Dad was to store my containers of liquid, in particular cans of paint and such, upside down. The demon of air will dry out paint, or cause it to get a dry skin layer inside the can as air that penetrates through the lid. However, when the wet liquid presses against the inside of the lid there’s less air to dry it out, and the paint will last longer.

paint_upsidedown

In this photo above you can see a few small plastic jars of some recently made gouache paint turned upside down on their lids. This is how I store them. Sometimes I put labels on the bottom. Behind them is a jar of Golden Acrylic Gesso, a bottle of acrylic medium, and some paint tubes. The bottle of medium is a little unwieldy on its cap, so I have to place it in a drawer in such a way that it won’t tip over, usually against other similar bottles stored in the same way. The paint tubes can be a problem since most manufacturers use very small caps that won’t let you balance the tube upright. Liquitex tubes are nice and large for that, but not most other brands. Alternatively, you should squeeze the tubes from the end, forcing the paint to the top and get the same benefit.

paint_upsidedown2

This is also a good way to store any cans of left over house paint you might have in the garage. Be careful of potential leaks, however, and put a plastic sheet underneath, just in case.

The motivation for this post was my reading that Golden is going to start labeling their cans upside down to encourage people to get use to this way of storing their supplies. Good for them.