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Grafix Wet Media Film and Gouache Test #2

November 23, 2012

Continuing the testing from my previous post, I am going to show gouache paint samples on Wet Media film sheets, and see what happens when they are overlapped. You can paint on both sides of the film sheet, as well as place them on top of each other, and since they are clear you can see through to whatever colors are beneath.

The image on the left is the same one from my previous post showing several different gouache paint samples. The second image shows another scanned sheet of the same colors plus white and black. I’ve also cut out three shapes on the far right side of this sheet with a razor blade. The image on the right shows the two sheets overlapped with the center one lying on top of the left one. Notice how the paint underneath tints the paint on the top sheet through the transparent areas of paint on the top sheet. Also in the close-up below, notice the cut out shapes on the far right, and how the clear sheet is creating a slight shadow tone on the surface beneath. The paint itself also casts a shadow.

Examining this overlapping effect a bit more, I painted two small film pieces with swatches of yellow orange and blue. On the left image below you can see how they look when one is placed on top of the other. Beneath them is another sheet showing those two colors mixed together. In the second image below I’ve glued the two pieces to each other with Double-Tack tape. This is a clear double-sided tape that Grafix sells for mounting these polyester films to a surface. Although the tape is clear it can create a bubbled texture in unpainted areas that can’t be avoided. If the whole surface is painted, it’s not noticeable. The colors beneath show up more clearly and the shadow effect is minimized when the sheet is glued down as opposed to loosely lain on a surface.

In this next example below I’ve painted a yellow orange color swatch on one side of the film with blue and green swatches on the other side. The tinting caused to the top color by the color on the back is very subtle, even if the paint beneath is at full strength and very saturated. On the right image below I’ve placed that sample on top of the black paint shown in the first image above. Even the darkest value of black won’t show through when the back of the top sheet is painted unless those top colors are very transparent washes. The more colors and sheets you overlap, the more opaque those areas become.

That’s all for this post. Observations: you could draw on one side with ink and then paint on the back, as is done with animation cells. As seen in the first image above, you can also scrape the paint away to show what’s underneath. Dry media, such as pencils, don’t work well on this film, but you could place it on top of pencil drawings. China markers or litho crayons work okay. Oil pastels kind of work, but they slide around quite a bit. Oil paint and acrylics work well, and I’ll show that in my next posting.

One big concern I have about loose overlapping film sheets touching layers of paint is that this might not be safe in the long run. I’ve seen old paintings that have been damaged by moisture when glass or plastic is pressed against the paint surface. However, if these sheets were glued together then moisture couldn’t penetrate to cause problems. I’ll send a message about this to Grafix and see what they recommend. By the way, if you happen to have other types of clear thin plastic sheets like this lying around, don’t mix them up because you won’t be able to tell them apart without painting on them.

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